25 Jammers New and Old

The last Session of the Year was the longest I can remember, with over 25 Jammers new and old wandering in throughout the day and rocking the joint for a mere eight hours.

Glen (Il Duce to those in the know) went all out with a great set-up (he even put in foldbacks fergawdsake), opened up the Atrium and the Beer Garden to the street, and got blessed with a really fine day (the Gods must be tone deaf)   After a fine light luncheon (nobody died) around 25 musicians swapped and chopped all day long, ably mustered by Captain Chaos hisself, who did, it must be said, look a little stuffed by the end.

The singers – Anne Smith, Anne Hayres, Sonia Davoine, Melinda Traves and Sevil Sabah , Marita and Lehma, amongst others, really turned it on. Doug Haircut Kuhn drove that stick bass all day long, Matthias, The Hirsh,  Sebastien, and others rattled the skins, The Captain, Jason, Keef, Peter, Dennis, Kepler, Marion, and I can’t remember who else soloed, Ben and Ray Hood (the original Lounge Lizard) on guitars, Blonde Bob, Gentleman John Curtis and meself, amongst others, tickled the plastics, and there too was the invisible trombonist, Jack Morris.

A great end to a fine year of Jam Sessions – there were four people there who, to the best of my knowledge, have been going to the Jams for over 23 years. And still can’t get it right. Makes you wonder..

We will be back on 18th January.

Hortense and Madge from Altona send their regards.

Toodle Pip!

The Leinster Bar… well, we stuffed that up didn’t we?

After last week’s gallimaufrey of bass players, this week it was the piano players turn:

Ade Ish, Larry from Townsville, Rory Clark, Sam Izzo, Gentleman John Curtis (welcome back, were ya been!), the Venerable Bob and meself all got a short turn eventually. The Ageing Roue played an inordinate amount of might fine sax, and the Captain played a subordinate amount of mighty fine sax, as did Noel. Ben and Chic provided some neat guitar work, hardly anyone sang (well, Kevin smoothed things out for a while), young tyros Tom and Mike played drums and trombone,  Doug Haircut Kuhn nearly got trampled in the rush, Sebastien rattled between good and not so, and Colonel T of the Fourth Light Punjab Horse  provided a relieving role on bass.

So, why did we stuff it up? Such was the seemingly endless procession of hot jazz that a few of the less experienced jammers missed out or left early – with that much talent in the room, getting up to play after them would be an unnerving experience.

The essence of the jams is to get everyone involved as much as possible, even if this does mean that the standard of music becomes a bit, err, variable. So if you missed out, please come back and if Coltrane walks in and takes over, we will toss him out in your favour, on the grounds that (a) he needs to join in not take over, (b) he probably won’t come back next week as he is too busy reissuing dodgy compilation CD’s,  (c) he is dead and (d) we would rather you played anyway. Or any way, as long as it is fun.

Or not as the case may be…

Props to Peter Cole for getting this, waiting for his opportunity,  and blowing up a storm, to Sam Izzo who got the briefest of sessions and still got drowned out by the soloists,  and most particularly to Colonel T for his patience before finally getting up on bass and swinging. Unheard of, call a doctor. Or a vet. Or a mechanic. I give up, what does he run on?

We will try to do better next time –

TW

The Carringbush Chroinicles: Tales from the Gold Street Gossip Shop

One of the quieter sessions – possibly a result of everyone who was not there nursing a post Grand Final hangover, possibly because it was as cold as a mother– in-law’s kiss, what with it being Spring in Melbourne. Whatever. Madge from Altona was not there, as she had sensibly retired to the inner recesses of her Refinery terrace condo with two bottles of Red Ned, three sailors and a packet of Winnie Blues. Hortense could have been there. Or so she would ruefully muse, in the absence, yet again of Rotten Ronnie, who has, it would seem, been spending a lot of time playing hot licks at Mme Trixie La Belle’s Academie de Danse, Altona Campus. On his saxophone, if you were wondering…

But I digress. Probably just as well, because the music emanating from the Gold Street Sheltered Workshop was of an up and down variety: Kay as chanteuse solitaire, working overtime, Ben playing elegant jazz riffs, Adam, Brian and Anton playing some lively bass, and Nick having an exploratory hit to great effect on drums: shaded, it must be said, by Tom on A Night in Tunisia. An afternoon occasionally enlivened by a thrilling competition between drummer and guitarist – smack the ride hard enough and it might just drown out the guitar. Or vice versa. Apparently it is a competition these days, but they do let the rest of us play music at the same time. How kind.
TW