Live Streams, Dead Pubs, the Laws of the Jam Session

Apparently, last week’s article headed Epistrophy struck a chord. I should stop right there, should I not? As if….Thank you for the feedback all the same.

First up, a bit about live – streaming music. We have had time to catch up on comments from the main stream media, or what is left of it. Seems current circumstances are disrupting the model of music streaming.

(See mediaredef-newsletter@mediaredefined.com)

Streaming model businesses have all sought to provide access to every artiste in the known universe, or on the planet at least. And they have all been jolly successful – if you can get it on Spotify, it is bound to be on Itunes, Pandora, Amazon and Tidal. So they are no longer competing on quality or exclusivity so much as on being cheap, easy and available. At 30,000,000 tunes, it would take 79.9 years of nonstop listening to Spotify alone to get through them all.

Going live online: Seems that the current trend is for musicians to create concerts on line rather than in person, bypassing the streaming services as wellas the great unwashed and going straight to social media – Facebook, Youtube, Instagram, Whats App and the like. Apparently no-one has yet come up with a more efficient way of spreading viruses than a music festival or concert

Adding fuel to the fire, the current users of streaming services are apparently moving away from new music, and going the nostalgia route. So musicians can now choose between not getting paid much a by a streaming service, not getting paid at all because the gigs have all been cancelled, and not getting paid much by putting on their own concert or getting paid heaps by being dead.

Anecdotally, those jammers who have tried the online caper say it is technologically unreliable, and in particular creates timing issues. All that technology can barely provide a substitute for the live experience, even if it does improve, which of course it will because technology is like that. Should anyone doubt that, I got it from several sources, including a Wiltshire based Ukulele group. So there.

Personally, can’t wait to play live again. Ditto, I suspect. Most jammers…

Pubs with Pianos I haven’t Played At: Somewhere in south western Queensland there is a run down shack called the Toompine Hotel. It sits on the side of the Quilpie Thargomindah Road – a dirt track halfway between nowhere and nowhere else – I had ridden up it on a 1000cc Honda, with no map, not much petrol, and no water, mainly because Thargomindah was closed.

Turns out around 70% of all passing traffic stops at the Toompine Hotel. So I did too. . It is a bit like Wall Drug in that respect except Wall Drug is also closed, and it is in South Dakota. But I digress. There was an Opal rush in Toompine in the late 1800’s, but only the Hotel and the Cemetery and about six street signs got built The streets were called 1st Street, 2nd Street and so on. Probably a saxophone player there somewhere. Dead opal miners made it to the Cemetery. Everybody else packed up their tent and went to Lightning Ridge.

So… parked the bike, walked in for a chat with the landlord. There was a piano at the side of the bar. Who’da thought?. “That’s nothing” the barkeep said, “there’s another one out the back – I’ll show you” So through the back door, and there was another bar, with another piano along side. Who’da thought? Whilst I mused on the statistical improbability of finding two pianos in the outback, he opened a door at the back of the bar, and there, in a dingy room, was another piano, only this one was falling through the floor as the floorboards had been eaten by termites. Turns out there is not, statistically speaking , much between the odds of two and three pianos.

As none of them were in tune, I finished my drink, got back on the bike and went to Quilpie instead – where they had a surf club on the shores of Lake Quilpie. I bought the story and the teeshirt in the Quilpie Cafe.

Next week’s newsletter Why I stopped at Wall Drug, South Dakota, but not at the Ocean Inn, Dymchurch
TW

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